• Afdrukken

Never too late!

One of the evident advantages composers enjoy compared to over the board player is having a second chance to correct their mistakes, even after 36 years!

In 1978 a study by Amatzia Avni won 1st prize in the

Israeli annual tourney:

                   
White to play and draw

The intended solution was 1.Rg1 (threatening mate in one) and now:

1…Ng2 2.R:g2! Rd1+ 3.Bg1 Bd5 4.e4 B: e4 5.f3 B: f3 stalemate.

1…Nf3! 2.Rg3+ Kh4 3.R:f3! Rd1+ 4.Bg1 Bd5 5.e4! B: e4 6.Kh2 R: g1! (6…B: f3 stalemate) 7. Rh3+ Kg4 8.f3+ B: f3 9.Rg3+ R: g3 stalemate.

A nice piece which was later chosen to be included In a Fide Album; in his book "Solving in Style", John Nunn commented "To achieve three stalemates from such a natural initial position is quite a triumph for the composer".

Alas, in the late nineties, when the age of accessible chess software has arrived, a flaw was discovered: The line 1…Nf5 2.e4 Rd2 3.R:g6, previously assessed as a draw, was actually winning for black with 3…Bc4! when the threat 4…Bd3 proves to be decisive

Sometimes a study is busted beyond repair. On other occasions a correction is found but some content of the original work is lost. The composer tried over the years to correct his work, but in vain. A happy ending to the story came only in 2014, 36 years after first publication, when the famous composer Gady Costeff gave a helping hand. By making a small change in the original position, he kept the play and the three stalemates intact.

Amatzia Avni 1978

 Correction by Gady Costeff 2014

 

White to play and draw

Amended solution: 1.Rg1 (1.Ne1 Bg4 2.Ra3+ Bf3+ 3.Kg1 Rg4+ 4.Bg3 Be4 will lose shortly) 1…Nf3 (1…Ng2 2.R:g2 etc.) 2. Rg3+ Kh4 3.R:f3 e1=Q+ 4.N:e1 R: e1+ 5.Bg1 etc.

Posted: Januar 30 - 2015

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